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Online Music Ed - PluggerBeatz - Prince - Rupert's Hi-Fi Odyssey - SaxWindBrass

Seeking Sponsors - Songbird - Spotify - Teo Milea - Violins - Why Music?

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Saul by Handel

Another of the pieces of music I sang as a member of a local choir was Saul. Saul is an oratorio in 3 acts written in 1738 by G F Handel (1685-1759)  with a libretto by C Jennens. Saul was first performed at the King's Theatre in London on 16 January 1739. The work was a success at its London premiere and was revived by Handel in subsequent seasons.

Handel is probabaly most famous for another of his oratorios, the Messiah of 1742, and more specifically, its Hallelujah Chorus. The custom of standing for the "Hallelujah" chorus originates from a belief that, at the London premiere, King George II did so, which would have obliged all to stand. There is no convincing evidence that the king was present, or that he attended any subsequent performance of Messiah; the first reference to the practice of standing appears in a letter dated 1756.[52][53][54]

Saul front

Mr. Handel's head is more full of Maggots than ever: I found yesterday in His room a very queer Instrument which He calls Carillon (Anglice a Bell) & says some call it a Tubal-cain, I suppose because it is in the make and tone like a Hammer striking upon Anvils. 'Tis played upon with Keys like a Harpsichord, & with this Cyclopean Instrument he designs to make poor Saul stark mad. His second Maggot is an Organ of 500£ price, which (because he is overstock'd with Money) he has bespoke of one Moss of Barnet; this Organ, he says, is so contriv'd that as he sits at it he has a better command of his Performers than he us'd to have; & he is highly delighted to think with what exactness his Oratorio will be perform'd by the help of this Organ; so that for the future, instead of beating time at his Oratorio's, he is to sit as his Organ all the time with his back to the Audience ... I could tell you more of his Maggots: but it grows late, and I must defer the rest till I write next; by which time, I doubt not, more new ones will breed in his Brain.

(Burrows, Donald (2012). Handel (Master Musicians Series).
Oxford University Press, USA; 2 edition. ISBN 978-0-19-973736-9, p266)

It goes something like this...

Taken from the First Book of Samuel, the story of Saul focuses on the first king of Israel's relationship with his eventual successor, David; one which turns from admiration to envy and hatred, ultimately leading to the downfall of the eponymous monarch.

(Adapted from Wikipedia - 29 Sept '15)

Saul back

Music Education Online

I'm interested in other music startups, and have a growing list on this website. I am aware of a number of online music education startups and have a a few broad questions.

I started by asking Meghan Gilkey, accounts manager at Wifi Music School, some questions.

Can you learn music online?, and if so, how?
Can you learn to play an instrument online?
And if so, how; e.g. Skype lessons, video lessons, ….?
Does the teacher have to be in the same physical space as the student?

I'd love to hear about the Wifi music school, and your thoughts on the above.

Yes, I do believe it is possible to learn an instrument online. Many people learn just by watching others, which is possible if you are just watching videos online, a DVD that comes with a method book, or a teacher you are meeting with in person. Currently, all of our lessons are done via Skype.

We have teachers from around the world. We only accept the best educators. All of our teachers have gone through our screening process, have had a face to face Skype meeting, and then evaluated once more before they are permitted to teach on our website. Just this weekend we had a teacher from Kansas who was teaching a student in Nicaragua!

My initial concern was, how important is it for a (e.g. piano) teacher to be in the same room as their student. I wonder if it depends on the level the student is at.

Do you think learning through e.g. youtube video as a complete beginner is a good way / the best way to learn to play an instrument?

I can imagine that it might be a sufficient means of developing once a student has reached a certain level, but I think the 1 to 1 interaction, being in the same space, to allow for personalised teaching / learning is the best way to start learning to play an instrument. If a student doesn't have the money to pay for a teacher, if there aren't any available teachers located near the student, then video may be an option.

Do you think there are any potential language barriers between a student in Nicaragua and a teacher in Kansas?

Yes, I do believe it is possible to learn an instrument online. Many people learn just by watching others, which is possible if you are just watching videos online, a DVD that comes with a method book, or a teacher you are meeting with in person. Currently, all of our lessons are done via Skype.

We have teachers from around the world.  We only accept the best educators. All of our teachers have gone through our screening process, have had a face to face Skype meeting, and then evaluated once more before they are permitted to teach on our website. Just this weekend we had a teacher from Kansas who was teaching a student in Nicaragua!

Personally, I learned my instrument in a band classroom. In the class, there were 30 other students, therefore I do not believe I learned as much as I could have just from that class.  I do not think it would be crucial for the teacher to be in the same physical room as the student if they are a qualified teacher.  Qualified teachers are trained to teach many different ways, not every student learns the same way.  Yes, I do think it would be an adjustment for both the teacher and student at first, but I do think this would be a successful way of teaching/learning because the student and teacher are still having one-on-one sessions.  This will allow the teacher to address the student how he/she learns most effectively just the same as if they were in the same physical room.

Growing up in a small rural area I did not have the option of private lessons, so I went online and learned several different techniques, and styles via video.  My band director would have never taught me the things I learned on online. Even if he did, I do not feel he would have done it as effectively.

I do agree that it may be different to start out learning via online lessons, but I do believe it is possible.  People now are constantly learning how do to things online, whether it be math, learning how to fix their vehicles, or home maintenance; so why not music?  Also, we only allow the best musicians and teachers on our website, therefore we are confident that our teachers are communicating their lesson to the best of their ability.

Our generation is one of technology.  Everything is done online, whether it be communicating (even we are communicating with technology), homework is done online, basically everything we do is now available to do online.

I do think there could be language barriers.  However, I also see it as an opportunity to learn more about the culture each person brings.  Culture is a huge influence on music, understanding music, and creating your own music.  I see learning different cultures as a way to open the 'box' with our creativity and levels of understanding.

I also wanted to know more about Dime online.

"DIME ONLINE has partnered with Falmouth University, the UK’s number 1 Arts University, to offer a unique music education experience. Our degree courses are for committed musicians and enterprising individuals who wish to excel in the professional music industry and want the freedom to choose where and when to study. Innovative content and superb online resources are supported by a team of professional musicians and industry experts who have worked hard to develop and maintain a position at the forefront of the digital music scene. From week to week – through forums, tutorials, and master classes – our team will coach and guide you to achieve the highest standards in all aspects of your performance, songwriting or music entrepreneurship.

Like you, our teaching staff value the freedom to work in a way that affords flexibility and self-direction so that they can maintain their professional commitments and deliver the most current methods and techniques relevant to your study.

Throughout your degree, you are a welcomed member of Falmouth University. Falmouth has a long established reputation for delivering forward-thinking, practice-based courses; the institution’s highly regarded expertise in the creative disciplines has informed, and will continue to enhance, the design and development of the courses here at DIME ONLINE.

DIME ONLINE and Falmouth University bring you advanced online provision, designed and developed with you and your lifestyle in mind."

I chatted to Tim Ferrone, the head of music entrepreneurship at DIME online.

What do you think about DIME online?

I think Dime online is a great proposition and a wonderful place for students to learn. It occurred to me when I studied my own degree that, from a purely educational perspective, as long as one remained disciplined, it wasn't actually necessary to be 'on campus.' There is as much to learn in the online environment, at far less expense and inconvenience; though I would say that its important that its placed in the contact of interaction with relevant people - there is a sizeable social interaction element to university lifestyle in general, which in itself can be hugely valuable. One can achieve some of that via the online platforms too, but I wouldn't substitute it entirely. Business is still about people, so you have to be able to go out there and get it. I have to say, from what I have observed, I also think the course content is a cut above some of the other higher education establishments I'm aware of too - there is a level of detail that surpasses the alternatives. Plus if you really engage with it and take on the weekly tasks that are set, you cannot fail to learn. That's incredibly valuable. Finally, Dime online allows you direct access to experienced industry personnel who more than likely wouldn't otherwise be able to make themselves available to regularly attend a traditional learning environment. And in the music business, who you know is vitally important of course..

Why did you get involved?

For a few reasons; because I'm able to do so without impacting on my main business focus of music marketing. Also because I felt the course content, administration and students were of a high calibre. From a personal perspective, I also get a lot out of interacting with the student community; it's easy to forget what you know, so to be challenged is very useful. But also, I'm of a generation beyond the general student lifestyle; I still like to examine a physical product, I treat social media as a professional necessity rather than a way of communicating with people etc etc and much of the record business behaves in similar patterns. It's a great advantage for me to interact with people who don't behave that way because, more often than not, it's those people we are trying to engage with on an artist/consumer level. I'm quite sure that I learn as much from the students as they do from me.

What thoughts do you have about learning online in general? 

As long as students remain disciplined and focussed, I think online learning is brilliant. In fact, because it takes discipline, I actually think the proportion of entrepreneurial pro-active type personalities is much higher than in a traditional learning environment, where some people are, to some extent, still just going through the motions. As I said earlier, there is still no substitute for interacting with people in the real world as well as studying online (I wouldn't want to encourage one without the other), but as a pure learning environment, I think there are many advantages. 

"Tim Ferrone has spent over fifteen years in the recorded music business, working with new and established artists, both domestically and overseas. He began his career in the marketing department at EMI Records before moving on to an International role at Universal. At the same time he had begun to manage artists in his own right, and a full-time move into artist management was the logical next step. Seven successful years in artist management were followed by heading up the International department for Ministry of Sound, over-seeing campaigns for the likes of London Grammar, before Tim established his own international marketing consultancy, Wrapped Up Music" dime-online.org/tutors-contributors

Online music education startups

Cademi

Cademi is the UK's first music lesson marketplace. Cademi’s mission is one, to match students with their perfect teacher. The experience of learning an instrument comes from the connection you have with your teacher. Similar taste in music allows students to become passionate about their instrument and learn much more. Cademi’s comforts permit students to search for their music teacher in their area in just a few quick clicks…no more being part of a traditional music school! Cademi has been made for you, so if you have any comments on how the service could be improved we are always here to help and receive your feedback.

cademi

"Ever since I was little I played many different instruments, from the piano to the guitar, and from the bass guitar to the violin, but I never focused on one instrument. During my university years, I gave guitar and piano lessons, and discovered what was the problem that prevented students from being the best they could be: the ways of teaching were boring and dated, the student’s music taste did not match that of the teacher, and even more so, finding a quality teacher was not easy!’’

‘’After many years of playing the bass guitar, I stopped playing once I moved to Australia. When I returned to the UK I decided I wanted to start playing again. I began researching online for teachers in my area, but all that I could find were teachers without a profile or any of their background information. This is when the idea of a service like Cademi came to mind. Cademi was going to be created so music teachers could have the opportunity to promote themselves, and students like myself would be able to search for teachers and find their perfect match. It all began there!’’

collabramusic.com

Founded on 31 January 2012 @ Louisville, Kentucky 40202
Collabra helps music instructors and their students collaborate online to become better musicians faster.  info@collabramusic.com

kadenze.com

WELCOME TO THE FUTURE OF CREATIVE EDUCATION. Kadenze brings together educators, artists, and engineers from leading universities across the globe to provide world-class education in the fields of art and creative technology.

Kadenze has partnered with leading academic institutions to offer select courses for actual college credit. Upon completion, these rigorous college-level courses will provide credits that are recognized by the institutions that offer them.*

*Participation in these courses does not represent an acceptance decision or admission from the institution that offers them. For more information, please refer to our support page on for-credit courses.

musicgurus.com

musicgurus.com - "online music education service including world-class musicians and has so far raised 73% of its target. The service is now live with recurring revenue from paying customers and the company is raising a seed round to scale the service.” crowdcube.com - musicgurus

online.berklee.edu/school/courses/music_education

feedyourmusic.com

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Articles about music startups on Medium.com

what-if-every-app-was-a-music-app

why-independent-musicians-are-music-startups

music-startups-are-about-the-artists-not-the-code

music-startups-and-the-passion-problem

music-startups-succeed-because-of-passion-not-in-spite-of-it

On Sunday the 12th of July 2015 I went with my dad to Fairfield Hall in Croydon, South London, to hear Edward Elgar's "Dream Of Gerontius". My dad's sister was in the choir.

I fell in love with 'Gerontius' whilst singing it as a member of Roehampton University [SW London] Choir in c2001. I hadn’t even heard of it before that, let alone listened to it. [Just discovered Roehampton isn't offering a BMus anymore!]. We performed it at St Albans Cathedral which is just North of London.

Edward Elgar was an English composer who was born in 1857 and died in1934.  Many of you would recognise his Enigma Variations and/or Pomp and Circumstance Marches (the 1st March is aka "Land of Hope and Glory") by ear even if you didn't know them by name.

organ

For many years, I sang in 2 local community choirs; Tiffin Oratorio Choir (which was based at Tiffin Boys School) and the equivalent at Kingston Grammar School. 

KGS would rehearse & perform in the Autumn term (i.e. concert before Christmas); Tiffin in the Spring (i.e. concert before Easter).  Last night I asked my dad if he could remember when I first sang with either of the 2 choirs but he couldn't remember either.  Maybe I was 15?  I’m 35 now.  Being part of a choir was an ‘excuse’ to spend time with family (dad, his brother & wife, dads sister).  Singing in a choir was another way to learn about music, develop my passion for music, be part of something bigger than myself, to become more confident using my voice- to sing loudly and be heard but not above anyone else — to be equal, to make a difference.

I remember singing Hadyn’s Creation with Tiffin Oratorio not too long ago (was this Easter 2011?) - another piece I hadn’t heard prior to singing it.  At one point during the performance, I was emotionally affected so much by the music that I physically couldn't sing a number of bars.  (Bars are things with notes in; not drinks). I sang in the Tiffin concert at Easter 2011*, and then went to 1 or 2 rehearsals at KGS that September.

choir

Unfortunately I was involved in an accident on the 25th of September which resulted in a broken jaw and damage to / loss of some teeth so I stopped singing. After having had a couple of screws and wires in my upper (broken) jaw for a while after the accident, they were taken out.  Some of the teeth on the right of my upper jaw were pushed up into the gum so were ‘shorter’ than they had been.  I lost the teeth at the front of my bottom jaw, and was given a ‘bridge’ which was glued to the teeth either side of the gap.  After it fell out for the 8th time, the hospital agreed to give me implants.  I was told I did not have enough bone in that part of my lower jaw for implants so would need surgery to take a bit of bone from my (right) hip and put it in my jaw.  The bone was held in place by a few very small screws and I had to wait so many months for that to settle. For whatever reason the hospital and I lost touch; by the time I got to hospital again, they could only take out of the screws; so the other one is still there, and probably will be until I shuffle off, or into, this miracle of a planet called Earth.

I sang again around 2 Easters ago for 1 term but found it mentally/physically awkward so didn’t sing again the next time.  I found it SO frustrating, wanting, needing to sing in either of the 2 choirs, and at the same time not feeling like I could. 

choir & orchestra

My dental issues, i.e. implants at the front of my bottom jaw, were finally implanted earlier this year.  I sang again (Mozart / Sussamayr Requiem) for 1 day a month or two ago which was fun; we had a rehearsal during the day, and performed in the evening.  This time we were in Streatham, South London - where Dad was born in 1946. After the concert, he drove us (him, mum and me) down one road and pointed to a small wall separating the pavement from a front garden and said ‘my granddad built that wall’ with a certain amount of pride.

School staff come and go; some teachers stay longer than others - whether due to their enjoyment of the role, how well they get on with other staff and students, their ‘success’, changes in family circumstances or any number of other factors. Simon Toyne has been at Tiffin for 24 years.  My dad said he remembered being (in the choir for) Simon's first concert at Tiffin.  They sang Haydn’s Creation.  Dad recalled that Simon, who was 21 or so at the time, had said ‘Many of you have probably sung this more times than I have, but this is how I want it!’  The times I've had the pleasure of being lead, educated, inspired by him, I’ve always felt ‘I wish he’d been MY music teacher at (secondary) school’.  I vaguely recollect at least one of the previous conductors of the choir.  Roderick ‘Roddy’ Williams went on to pursue his (tenor) singing career.

Fairfield Halls, Croydon, South London, UK

As dad and I arrived Fairfield Halls last night, I reminded him that “The last time I came here was to hear Elgar’s Gerontius!”.  I could remember a particular part of the words of the work from when I sang it at Roehampton;

Low-born clods
Of brute earth, They aspire
To become gods

This section for chorus continues...

By a new birth
And an extra grace
And a score of merits,
As if aught
Could stand in place
Of the high thought
And the glance of fire
Of the great spirits,
The powers blest,
The lords by right
The primal owners,
Of the proud dwelling
]

choir & orchestra

One of the things I love about the opening orchestral introduction / movement is how my emotion changes - often at a bar to bar rate - sometimes note to note!  In fact one of the things I love about ALL music is how it affects my emotions; the way it takes me on an emotional journey.  Coming out of a concert / gig venue feeling emotionally, spiritually, and sometimes physically refreshed, or re-awakened is amazing.  I found / find Elgar’s Gerontius sad, melancholy, powerful, dramatic, hopeful, joyous, achingly beautiful - enough to bring tears to my eyes.  There are 1 or 2 climaxes in the 2 CD-length composition, which was performed without interval last night.

The orchestra (London based Brandenburg Symphony Orchestra) comprised strings (ten 1st violins, eight 2nd violins, 6 violas, 6 cellos, double basses), 4 horns, 3 trombones, 3 trumpets, 2 oboes, cor anglais, 2 clarinets, 1 bass clarinet, 2 flutes, piccolo (imagine a half size flute), 2 bassoons, 1 double/contra bassoon, tuba, timpani, snare drum, bass drum, cymbals, organ and harp.

choir & orchestra

At a certain point in the performance I thought to myself ‘I want to stand up when it’s finished and give a standing ovation - I don't care if I’m the first or the only person who does’. But I didn’t - no one else did. Then someone did, then others did, then (dad and) I did. The usual rounds of applause for the orchestra, soloists, children in the choir, and adult members were amplified by (I assume) everyone being aware that it was Simon’s last concert with Tiffin (it was noted in the program) - as a way of showing our appreciation for what he has done - the time he has put in. 

Who was it who said ‘talking about music is like dancing about architecture’?

Croydon, South London, UK

Part 1
Andrew Davis cond. - c1997
Philip Langridge - Gerontius
Catherine Wyn-Rogers - Angel
Alastair Miles - Priest/ Angel of the Agony
BBC Symphony Orchestra and Chorus

Part 2
Andrew Davis cond. - c1997
Philip Langridge - Gerontius
Catherine Wyn-Rogers - Angel
Alastair Miles - Priest/ Angel of the Agony
 BBC Symphony Orchestra and Chorus

Thank you Simon.

And Dad, for for sharing his love of music and allowing me to explore and develop mine, for taking me to this concert and to all of the choir reharsals and concerts I've been to with Tiffin & Kingston Grammar school since I was (let's say) 15.

Dad in Croydon, South London, UK

Music startups

What are you thinking about?
Services like Spotify? Soundcloud? Tidal?
Products like Bluetooth speakers? 
Event / ticket related startups?
Social music discovery platforms?
Apps?

Here are some music startups I've found

When does a startup stop being a startup?
When is a (startup) NOT a Tech (startup)
What makes a music startup from a startup in any other sector?
Is there / Where is the ‘music startup hub’?
(In the way that London may be the FinTech hub)
Who invests in music startups?  Who doesn’t, and why not?
Are there any music specific incubators / accelerators?

In response to my Google+ post (A)

The Music Entrepreneur
A lot of music startups today are tech startups, because there's a gold rush happening with streaming sites. Unfortunately, there isn't actually much gold to be had, and now that Apple is in the game, they may begin to exercise dominance in the field.

People like me tend to invest in music startups. I have also seen business owners (not necessarily those with a direct connection to the music industry), ambitious entrepreneurial types, and people that are passionate about the music industry invest in music businesses. I think it's tough for the layperson to invest, simply because of the sheer amount of money that's at play. Unless you're willing to problem-solve, take out a second mortgage, build a cash cow (i.e. a business), or save up like crazy, investing is a hard game to join in on.

JR Miller
I think the music industry is in the middle of a transition. It's difficult to see the future and what is going to happen for startups or any aspect of the industry. I'm not a songwriter but I am concern that unless something doesn't change in their favor, they will end up looking like the musicians playing as the Titanic slowly sinks into the ocean.

Rupert Cheek: When was the last time the music industry WASN'T going through change? Who was it who said "the best way to predict the future is to create it" ?

Rupert Cheek: +The Music Entrepreneur  & +JR Miller - would you mind if I included your thoughts in my article?

The Music Entrepreneur: +JR Miller I have to agree with Rupert here. In the last 15 to 20 years, the music industry has seen nothing but change. However, I am cautiously optimistic about the future of musicians and income opportunities. Technology has supported the growth of a lot of other industries, and I believe it can help with the music industry too.

The Music Entrepreneur: +Rupert Cheek absolutely. Also, let me know if you'd like to put a piece together for +The Music Entrepreneur website. Guest posts tend to do pretty well there, and I have a feeling you would do a great job.

Rupert Cheek: I was planning on publishing it on cheekypromo.com , and / but have been given the opportunity to submit pieces to the +Geeks Life community

In Response to my Google+ post (B)

Mike DeAngelis:

The issue is always money, attention (I mean the ability to focus on a artist and not follow trends)  creativity of the artist and the business acumen of the artist...which has to be established first. Start-ups are risky in any field...I don't see a trend in America or in other parts of the world for a Music start-up, its needed.  I think we prefer to whine and complain about the music industry rather than do something about it. That could be because most artists are not business people and have no idea on how to start. They certainly are suspicious of lawyers, accountants and business people.  Sorry its not probably what you wanted but this is where I see the stumbling blocks for music startups.

Rupert Cheek
Hi +Mike DeAngelis - thanks for your response.  What is needed?

Mike DeAngelis
I believe we need startups, in music or in any field but as they are risky, competition is brutal and the old dogs won't give up their slice of the pie. So is it better as a  start up to toe to toe with the old dogs or carve out a niche where you are the leader of the pack.

Music Startup Incubators / Accelerators

Music + Tech + Entrepreneurship = Project Music. Project Music is the first music tech accelerator in the US and the first accelerator to focus on building the future of the music industry. The 8 startup graduates of the first Project Music cohort tell their story in this video created by the Edde Brothers.

ryangtanaka.com - LA-incubators-accelerators-artists-musicians-music-entrepreneurship

Angel List is a platform for startups. Search for music on AngelList

"Red Bull Amplifier launched in April [2015] with a mission to find the most innovative new music start-ups and give them an opportunity only Red Bull can provide. Thanks for everyone who applied, we have been inundated with brilliant music startups and have been genuinely impressed with the level of talent we have seen"

"Project Music is the Nashville Entrepreneur Center’s leading action to support innovation within the music industry, a core business vertical in Nashville's economy. To meet the unique needs of music-minded entrepreneurs we are providing a year round music-entrepreneurship focus that brings music, tech and business leaders together to nurture startups desiring to grow music industry revenue." (www.hypebot.com - project-music-incubator)

"What Fort Knox’s founders felt was missing, however, was a space for nurturing music, film and creative technology startups. So they decided to turn some of their enormous property into an incubator, providing cheap office space, as well as access to mentors and programs, such as an artist in residency program, through which a musician can build an entire team–manager, lawyers and so on–with incubator tenants...." forbes.com - music startup-incubator, Chicago

Music streaming turns music from a product into a service

How do you feel about music streaming?
What experience do you have?
Do you have any experience as a musician having your music on any streaming services?
Did you get paid?
Why did/didn't you add your music to any given service?
How did you choose which service(s) to add your music to?
Potential number of listeners/listens / any potential financial reward?

Sam Deeley: If you're an emerging artist you should be less concerned about money & more concerned about people listening to you so go for it IMO

Larry H Shone I think its a killer of musician's jobs

Rupert Cheek Absolutely? i.e. for all musicians all the time?

Larry H Shone I think ultimately yes.  I prefer to have my music on some form of physical entity, preferably a CD. Or on my iPod so I can play any time.

Rupert Cheek Because of the quality of CD (compared to streaming) and your ability to listen to it whenever you want…?

Larry H Shone The latter, but I'm also concerned for the artists. When you pay to stream an album most of that money goes to the streaming service. It should go to the artist.

Rupert Cheek I agree with you. What about the physical distribution model? How much goes to the distributor? How much goes to the label, and the publisher..?

Larry H Shone No idea. But if artists aren't getting revenue then they will stop playing, and all our music will be auto generated pap , or the stuff, I won't call it music, that the likes of Kanye West produce. No skill, no artistry.

Rupert Cheek how long will they go on playing without getting paid? before breaking even? Depends on the musician doesn't it?

The Music Entrepreneur

A lot of great questions here, Rupert.

I don't think it does anything productive to antagonise streaming, but the reality of it is that neither streaming sites, nor the musicians who choose to make their music available on streaming sites, are terribly profitable.

My music is up on streaming sites, but the income from it is fairly negligible (it's less than a cent per play a lot of the time).

There isn't much in terms of financial reward, but appealing to a wider global fan base does mean distributing your music further than you might otherwise want to or even expect to.

Rupert

Do you notice any increase in listens/views/engagement/interest elsewhere online as a result of having your music on streaming sites?  Which streaming sites do you use? How did you decide which ones to use?

The Music Entrepreneur

It wasn't a scientific process by any means. Basically, I just chose to have my music distributed wherever it would make some money (I think that's an option you can select when you first sign up for distribution, actually). Based on my accounting overview, I can see that I'm signed up with Spotify, Google Play, Rdio, Last.fm, MixRadio, Rhapsody, and others.

Anil Prasad asks "In what other industry would suppliers offer their goods to distributors without being told precisely how much they’ll receive for their inventory?" medium.com/@Innerviews

In response to Parad's post, David Day wondered "I am a huge music fan and have made a living off of being a huge music fan and have been listening to SoundCloud or MixCloud for the last 7 years almost exclusively. Why don’t these music streaming stories ever talk about those sites? So bizarre. It’s like I live in an alternate universe."

Why Music?

I was born in, and live in SW London, UK (again).

I'm involved with music because as a child it was not only a positive outlet but a necessary one, an imperative one as it was a way for me to connect to others. Music is quite literally my first language. When I was young (3, 4..), I was not talking so had speech therapy. That didn't have much impact so I moved to music therapy. It helped [helps] me to communicate and connect with others, to express / be myself, to be part of the world.

Being part of 2 local community choirs was another way to be part of something bigger than myself, to become more confident using my voice- to sing loudly and be heard but not above anyone else - to be equal, to make a difference.

My educational background is in music - I had piano lessons for many years and studied music at university - piano, composition, theory, history…

I enjoyed working with children as a playworker and as a pianist at primary schools.

I gained experience as a solo pianist, accompanist, worked with other performers / creatives at / in transitstation and played drums in bands.

Since c2012 I have been developing my skills / experience / passion for using social media to connect with musicians and help them to connect / communicate with others.

Music promotion via Cheeky Promo is perhaps a prelude to / the first part of the journey towards the opening / development of an (arts centre); a way of finding people who can help with musical, social, educational enterprise.

Here are some music startups I've found

Logo & Website © Cheeky Promo 2016 / rupert@cheekypromo.com / (+44) (0)7447 907 357

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Roadie Tuner

drumshat1

Indie Rock Platter vol 1

intro to jazz piano

Roadie Tuner

drumshat1

Indie Rock Platter vol 1

intro to jazz piano

Roadie Tuner

drumshat1

Indie Rock Platter vol 1

intro to jazz piano

Roadie Tuner

drumshat1

Indie Rock Platter vol 1

intro to jazz piano

Roadie Tuner

drumshat1

Indie Rock Platter vol 1

intro to jazz piano

Roadie Tuner

drumshat1

Indie Rock Platter vol 1

intro to jazz piano

Roadie Tuner

drumshat1

Indie Rock Platter vol 1

intro to jazz piano

Roadie Tuner

drumshat1

Indie Rock Platter vol 1

intro to jazz piano

Roadie Tuner

drumshat1

Indie Rock Platter vol 1

intro to jazz piano

Roadie Tuner

drumshat1

Indie Rock Platter vol 1

intro to jazz piano

Roadie Tuner

drumshat1

Indie Rock Platter vol 1

intro to jazz piano

Roadie Tuner

drumshat1

Indie Rock Platter vol 1

intro to jazz piano

Roadie Tuner

drumshat1

Indie Rock Platter vol 1

intro to jazz piano

Roadie Tuner

drumshat1

Indie Rock Platter vol 1

intro to jazz piano

Roadie Tuner

drumshat1

Indie Rock Platter vol 1

intro to jazz piano

Roadie Tuner

drumshat1

Indie Rock Platter vol 1

intro to jazz piano

Roadie Tuner

drumshat1

Indie Rock Platter vol 1

intro to jazz piano